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The latest news from COP23 – 17 November

President Macron opens high-level talks at COP23. Image via Flickr: Ministry of Environment Rwanda
President Macron opens high-level talks at COP23. Image via Flickr: Ministry of Environment Rwanda

What has been going in the final days of the COP23 climate change negotiations?

Presidents Macron and Merkel opened high level talks as countries announced commitments to replace US funding for the International Panel on Climate Change, and to phase out coal by 2030. An agriculture negotiations deadlock has been broken after years, as developing countries won concessions, and with the EU having agreed reforms to its carbon market, the idea seems back on the table with the UN, California and China.

1. France and UK vow to make up for Trump’s withdrawal of climate change funding

President Emmanuel Macron says France aims to close down all coal-fired power plants by 2021. The UK also said that it would help the IPCC financially, announcing a doubling of funding.
Read more on The Independent

2. Merkel and Macron hail Europe’s climate leadership, acknowledge shortcomings

France and Germany’s leaders opened the high-level talks at COP23 on Wednesday, calling on other countries to match Europe’s climate goals. But with Germany heavily reliant on coal, how ambitious is Europe really?
Read more on Deutsche Welle

3. ‘Political watershed’ as 19 countries pledge to phase out coal

New alliance launched at Bonn climate talks hopes to signal the end of the dirtiest fossil fuel that kills 800,000 people a year with air pollution A new alliance of 19 nations committed to quickly phasing out coal has been launched at the UN climate summit in Bonn, Germany. A separate group of 19 nations say they plan to increase the use of wood and other plant matter from sustainable sources to generate energy as part of efforts to limit climate change.
Read more on Guardian Environment

https://twitter.com/AdamBandt/status/931110585986453507

4. UN talks plant seed for greener, more climate-savvy agriculture

UN climate talks in Bonn broke stalemate on agriculture this week, after discussions were blocked for several years over concerns they could result in obligations for developing states to curb emissions from farming, and for rich nations to pay for poorer farmers to adapt to a changing climate.
Read more on Thomson Reuters Foundation

5. Developing countries win concessions on early climate action at UN talks

A wrangle over the climate commitments made by rich countries before 2020 has resulted in several concessions to developing countries. They include –
1. calling on the UN secretary general Antonio Guterres to intervene in the refusal of the majority of parties to ratify the Doha Amendment of the Kyoto Protocol.
2. A process to track and report on progress to meeting pre-2020 commitments, including stocktakes in 2018 and 2019, and
3. An assessment of the finance rich countries are providing to help poor ones cope with climate change.
Read more on Climate Home

6. Carbon markets back in vogue at COP23

Carbon markets have become a vital piece of common ground for defenders of the climate. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told countries at the UN climate change conference to put price on carbon, and stop bad bets on fossil fuels.
Read more at Euractiv

7. Trump is blasted at climate talks, but Paris Accord lives on

The Trump administration made no notable efforts other than to hold a single public event promoting clean coal, leaving hope here that the Paris deal would endure.
Read more at POLITICO.eu

8. Green shipping leaders seek to chart decarbonisation course

A group of shipping industry leaders have unveiled a major new initiative to demonstrate how deep emissions reductions could be delivered across the sector. Dubbed Ambition 1.5C, the campaign brought together more than 150 senior figures from across the industry on the sidelines of the COP23 UN climate summit in Bonn. 
Read more on Business Green

9. Call for polluters to pay ‘climate damages tax’

Disappointed by slow progress on “loss and damage” in formal negotiations, more than 50 groups and individuals backed the “climate damages tax” idea.
Read more on Climate Home

10. What needs to happen by COP24 to keep the Paris Agreement on track?

Carbon Brief asked delegates what they thought needs to happen by COP24 to maintain the momentum of the Paris Agreement.
Watch on Carbon Brief

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